The 9 Best Power Racks to Add to Your Home Gym, According to Fitness Trainers

The 9 Best Power Racks to Add to Your Home Gym, According to Fitness Trainers

Best Overall Power Rack

REP Fitness PR-4000 Rack

PR-4000 Rack

Best Overall Power Rack

REP Fitness PR-4000 Rack

Pros
  • Quality, stable design
  • Compatible with a variety of add-on accessories
  • Compact and versatile design
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Add-on accessories can also be pricey

Who It’s For

If you’re not sure what to get, this rack is a good choice, in part because it offers a host of customization options in its rack builder (so it can become just about anything you need). It’s sturdy and classic, setting you up for most lifts, and is also one of the better options if you’re tight on space.

This rack offers a rock-solid foundation for various exercises, making it an excellent choice for powerlifting, CrossFit, or simply crushing your home workouts. Designed with limited space in mind, it ensures you don’t have to sacrifice your entire room for your home gym. Its relatively compact yet robust design makes it a top choice for individuals without unlimited space while also not sacrificing on the sturdiness of larger frame models.

What Our Editors Say About It

At its core, the PR-4000 boasts a robust steel frame that exudes stability and confidence, even when tackling heavyweights. With an impressive weight capacity of 1,000 pounds, it can handle the most grueling workout sessions. The adjustable spotting arms, pull-up bar, and J-cups seamlessly complement the rack’s durability, expanding your exercise possibilities from bench presses to chin-ups.

Samuel sums it up perfectly: “You can’t go wrong with this rack, and it’s customizable to suit your evolving needs. However, keep in mind that its initial price is just the beginning; additional add-ons can incrementally stack up, so plan your budget accordingly.”

Pro tip: Consider opting for the front foot extensions if possible. They provide extra versatility for the rack’s future growth without significantly increasing its footprint. Even in a snug gym, you can easily step over them, ensuring your space remains efficient and adaptable.

Potential Drawbacks

While the REP Fitness PR-4000 Rack offers incredible value and adaptability, it’s essential to be mindful of potential additional costs. As you customize and expand your setup, expenses can accumulate beyond the starting price. So, before making your purchase, carefully assess all potential expenditures to ensure your home gym investment aligns with your budget.

Read more: Best Adjustable Dumbbell Sets

Dimensions (D x W x H) 16″ – 41″ x 50.8″ x 80″ or 93″
Maximum weight capacity 1,000 lb.
Weight 260 lb.
Weight storage Available for an additional cost
Inside depth 16″, 24″, 30″, or 41″

Best Customizable Power Rack

The Force USA MyRack Modular Power Rack

MyRack Modular Power Rack

Best Customizable Power Rack

The Force USA MyRack Modular Power Rack

Now 38% Off

Pros
  • Adequate weight capacity
  • Modular design allows for extra customization
  • Reasonable price
Cons
  • Lightweight/may not be as sturdy as other designs

Who It’s For

If you’re searching for an uber customizable power rack that won’t break the bank, the Force USA MyRack Modular Power Rack should be on your radar. It strikes a great balance between performance and affordability with all the possible bells and whistles.

Its price point is notably attractive given its sturdy construction and compared to some of our other, similar favorites. Boasting a weight capacity of 1,000 pounds, it caters to those at more advanced fitness levels, providing a secure platform for challenging lifts.

What Our Editors Say About It

One of the standout features of this rack is its modular design, which opens the door to endless customization possibilities. Through interchangeable attachments and accessories (available for separate purchase), you have the power to tailor your setup precisely to your unique needs and preferences. You can seamlessly integrate weight storage, spotter platforms, and various other features, ensuring your equipment evolves with your needs, according to Fitness and Commerce Editor, Talene Appleton, NASM. “The MyRack’s flexibility and scalability impressed our team, offering a growth path that doesn’t come with a hefty price tag,” she explains.

Potential Drawbacks

It’s worth noting that most of the possible attachments and accessories are sold separately, which means the total cost of this rack can really add up over time. While this modularity provides a ton of flexibility, it can also get expensive.

Read more: Best Weightlifting and Strength Training Shoes

Dimensions (D x W x H) 47″ x 55″ x 87″
Weight < 180 lb.
Maximum weight capacity 1,000 lb.
Inside depth 29″
Weight storage Available add-on for $49.99

Best Folding Power Rack

Fray Fitness Savage Series Foldback Wall Mount Rack

Savage Series Foldback Wall Mount Rack

Best Folding Power Rack

Fray Fitness Savage Series Foldback Wall Mount Rack

Now 40% Off

Pros
  • Space-saving design
  • Does not compromise on stability
  • Reasonable price for the quality
Cons
  • Requires drilling into a secure wall

Who It’s For

If you’re in the process of creating a compact home gym and have sturdy walls you can anchor it to, this foldable option may be ideal for you. Crafted for those seeking an alternative to bulky gym equipment, this foldable rack proves its worth by optimizing space in even the coziest home gyms.

It may not be the best choice for renters or those aiming to lift extremely heavy weights, as it relies on the structural integrity of your walls. However, if your fitness goals revolve around comfortably benching and squatting up to 225 pounds, this foldable rack has got you covered.

What Our Editors Say About It

“This foldable from Fray has been a mainstay in my home gym. It’s easy to install (especially if you get the stringer) and so tough and durable that you feel comfortable bench-pressing and even doing heavy rack pulls,” says Samuel. Designed for those in need of an alternative to bulky equipment, this foldable rack can free up precious square footage in even the tiniest home gyms.
“It doesn’t fold completely flat when turning the posts in, though, which is the lone downside” says Samuel.

In our experience using this rack, the heavy-duty steel construction can handle just about anything we’ve thrown at it. It’s built to last and accommodate a wide range of exercises without taking up nearly as much space as a free-standing, 4-post set up, and that it does. And with a weight capacity of 1,000 pounds, you can be sure that this rack is not compromising on stability, either.

Potential Drawbacks

The folding design does have a few drawbacks, as pointed out by Samuel: “It doesn’t fold completely flat when you turn the posts in.” However, this small quirk is a negligible trade-off for the rack’s overall performance. It also has minimal storage space for weights, necessitating a separate weight plate tree. Additionally, there’s limited room for a spotter inside the rack, so be prepared for a closer benching experience with your spotter.

Folding the rack can be more cumbersome than it’s worth, primarily due to the repeated setup process and the increased space it occupies when folded outwards, requiring empty wall space around it. However, we find these inconveniences minor considering the overall benefits of this foldable rack for compact home gyms.

Read more: Best Home Gym Equipment

Dimensions (D x H) 21.5″ x 90.375″
Maximum weight capacity 500+ lb.
Weight 145 lb.
Weight storage No
Inside Depth 21.5″

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Best Budget-Friendly Power Rack

T-2 Series Power Rack

Amazon’s Choice

T-2 Series Power Rack

Best Budget-Friendly Power Rack

T-2 Series Power Rack

Pros
  • 28 adjustable positions total
  • Free delivery
  • Decent price
  • Available shorter model is great for low-ceiling rooms
Cons
  • Difficult to assemble

Who It’s For

For those seeking a sturdy yet straightforward power rack that is budget-friendly, this should be on your radar. Crafted from heavy-duty steel and finished with a durable powder coating, it comes complete with weight plate horns, pin/pipe safeties, reinforced J-Hooks, and a single pull-up bar. With two height options—71 inches and 83 inches—this power rack caters to a variety of spaces, making the shorter option well-suited for compact environments like basements.

What Our Editors Say About It

For a power rack, its walk-in design is generous, providing ample room for individuals of all sizes to execute a wide array of exercises efficiently and safely, without feeling confined.

“I haven’t come across a power rack with comparable build quality for $400 of less. It’s pretty unheard of,” says Appleton. “This is one of the few budget options that delivers a reliable performance without breaking the bank and without risking stability.”

Potential Drawbacks

Assembling this power rack is no walk in the park, but it’s an inconvenience we found minor in the grand scheme of its overall quality and affordability. It’s a solid product that offers excellent value for the price., but lacks the user-friendly finishes of more premium designs.

Read more: Best Barbells

Dimensions (D x W x H) 50″ x 57″ x 71″
Weight 133 lb.
Maximum weight capacity 850 lb.
Inside depth ~45″
Weight storage Minimal plate storage at base

Best Heavyweight Power Rack

Rogue Fitness RML-690C Power Rack 3.0

RML-690C Power Rack 3.0

Best Heavyweight Power Rack

Rogue Fitness RML-690C Power Rack 3.0

Pros
  • Incredibly durable construction
  • Highly customizable with add-on attachments
  • Weight storage

Who It’s For

The Rogue Fitness RML-690C Power Rack 3.0 is a powerhouse that’s designed to meet the needs of serious fitness enthusiasts lifting at home. With its robust construction and an array of add-on features, this power rack is the go-to choice for those who are willing to invest in their home gym setup without constraints on budget and space. If you’re committed to taking your home gym to the next level without tight space or budget constraints, this option deserves your consideration.

The availability of adjustable spotting arms, a pull-up bar, and J-cups, while at an additional cost, further enhances its functionality and versatility, allowing you to tailor your setup to your specific preferences.

What Our Editors Say About It

Throughout our rigorous testing of this rack, it consistently proved itself reliable and worthy of its price. Its heavy-duty construction and solid steel frame make it a versatile and heavyweight-approved cage that can handle the most demanding lifts with ease.

One feature that stood out to us on this cage is Rogue’s updated Westside Hole Pattern, which provides greater adjustability to accommodate your workout preferences and needs. Beyond its performance, we also found this rack one of the most sleek and stylish options aesthetically. Its power-coated finish not only adds overall durability but also ensures it looks good in any home gym setting.

Potential Drawbacks

While it’s true that this power rack comes with a higher price tag compared to some other options on the market, it justifies the investment with its exceptional design and unwavering functionality. As with most racks, desirable features, such as adjustable spotting arms, a pull-up bar, and J-cups, come at an additional cost, too. But if you’re looking for a power rack that combines both form and function, this choice is well worth its hefty price.

Read more: Best Weight Benches

Dimensions (D x W x H) 76″ x 49″ x 90.375″
Weight 530 lb.
Maximum weight capacity 1,000 lb.
Weight storage Yes
Inside depth 53″

Best Half Power Rack

Rogue Fitness HR-2 Half Rack

HR-2 Half Rack

Best Half Power Rack

Rogue Fitness HR-2 Half Rack

Pros
  • Great for smaller home gyms
  • Very easy to customize
  • Easy to install
Cons
  • Weight storage not included in base cost

Who It’s For

If you’re in search of a proven, robust option that’s a familiar sight in CrossFit gyms, take a closer look at the HR-2 Half-Rack. Built to withstand commercial usage, it’s a workhorse that can handle substantial weight.

The HR-2’s thoughtful design includes a smaller footprint, making it an excellent choice for individuals dealing with space constraints, too. It’s a prime candidate for home gyms, garage setups, and even small apartments.

With numerous height adjustment options for load placement, you can effortlessly pick up a bar for squats or lunges at your preferred height. It also accommodates a wide range of Rogue accessories, adding versatility to your workouts.

What Our Editors Say About It

“Out of all the half-racks I’ve tested, this is one of my classic favorites,” explains Samuel. His hands-on experience with this rack has reinforced its pull-up bar is ultra-sturdy, perfect for explosive movements like muscle ups.

Potential Drawbacks

While the HR-2 Half-Rack offers versatility and customization options, it’s essential to be aware of the ceiling height requirement. To comfortably accommodate this rack, your space should have ceilings that are at least 7 feet tall. To do pullups and muscle ups, you’ll need even more vertical height.

Read more: Best Smith Machines

Dimensions (D x W x H) 48″ x 49″ x 92.25″ or 110.25″
Weight 225- 255 lb.
Maximum weight capacity 1,000+ lb.
Inside depth 48″
Weight storage Available for an additional cost

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Best Splurge Power Rack

Hammer Strength HD Athletic NX Half Rack

HD Athletic NX Half Rack

Best Splurge Power Rack

Hammer Strength HD Athletic NX Half Rack

Pros
  • Relatively compact footprint
  • Built to last
  • Included features (2-handle pull-up bars, weight storage, etc.) offer a ton of versatility
Cons
  • Expensive
  • Low weight capacity for the price point

Who It’s For

If you’re on the hunt for the king of half racks, a fully featured option that wouldn’t look out of place in a commercial gym, then this Hammer Strength design is a great choice. If you’re fortunate enough to have a spacious garage or barn home gym structure with ample overhead clearance, this rack is ideal. It delivers a gym-quality lifting experience for a wide range of exercises and is as rock-solid as they come.

The 3″ x 3″ 11-gauge uprights are crafted for longevity and feature laser-cut holes and numbering for precise adjustments during your training sessions. It’s a rack built to last, and the only reason you’ll ever need another is if you decide to downsize your gym.

What Our Editors Say About It

“This is the Cadillac of half racks, an ultra-sturdy lifting experience that can take on massive amounts of weight for all movements,” explains Samuel. “I can test maxes on this rack with ease.

“I’ve never felt more comfortable dropping weights in a rack than I do with this one. The adjustable spotter arms are super-sturdy with very little give, making this perfect for advanced training concepts like iso-hold squats and deadlifts.”

Potential Drawbacks

As much as we love this rack, it’s important to note that it is definitely not for those with limited space. You’ll need substantial floor space and vertical real estate to accommodate it.

Another aspect to consider is that the pull-up bar, while versatile with its multi-grip configuration, lacks a standard straight-bar option, which some users may miss. Additionally, the spotter arms are on the shorter side, requiring adjustment in your technique when stepping out of the rack with a load. It’s a minor inconvenience but worth noting for those accustomed to specific preferences.

Read more: Best Indoor Rowing Machines

Dimensions (D x W x H) 50″ x 48″ x 86″
Weight Not listed
Maximum weight capacity 405 lb.
Inside depth 50″
Weight storage Yes

Best Premium Squat Rack for Small Spaces

Hammer Strength HD Athletic NX Squat Stand

HD Athletic NX Squat Stand

Best Premium Squat Rack for Small Spaces

Hammer Strength HD Athletic NX Squat Stand

Now 10% Off

Pros
  • Compact footprint compared to full-sized racks
  • Comes with all the necessary attachments, with more sold separately
  • Looks elite
  • Sturdy weight capacity

Who It’s For

Don’t its stripped down footprint fool you–this squat rack delivers on stability and function. Designed to accommodate most home lifters, it boasts a robust build within a small footprint that can handle weights of up to 405 pounds with ease. It also doesn’t sacrifice aesthetics in the pursuit of performance.

If you have limited space in your home gym, this small-footprint version of the NX half rack may be ideal for you. It maintains the same level of build quality as its larger counterpart and stands out as one of the sturdiest options among basic squat rack designs.

What Our Editors Say About It

This is essentially the small-footprint version of the NX half rack. It’s a better fit in tight home gyms, and is of similar build quality, and among basic squat rack designs, it’s one of the sturdiest options.

“The spotter arms on this rack are on the shorter side, so keep that in mind,” says Samuel.

Potential Drawbacks

While the compact design of this squat rack is ideal for tight home gyms, it does come with a trade-off in terms of weight storage. You’ll have less space for plate storage, and the placement of the plates near the ground can be a bit frustrating, particularly when you’re fatigued after demanding deadlift sessions. This inconvenience is a minor drawback to consider.

With a price tag just north of $2,000, it may not be the most budget-friendly option in its category. However, it’s worth noting that this rack is proudly made in the USA and backed by a 10-year warranty. This level of quality assurance speaks to the rack’s durability and long-term reliability, making it a sound investment for your home gym.

Dimensions (D x W x H) 53″ x 48″ x 86″
Weight Not listed
Maximum weight capacity 405 lb.
Weight storage Yes
Inside depth 50″

Best Barebones Squat Power Rack

REP Fitness SR-4000 Squat Rack

SR-4000 Squat Rack

Best Barebones Squat Power Rack

REP Fitness SR-4000 Squat Rack

Pros
  • Solid prices for a no-frills option
  • 2×2 design saves footprint space
  • Weight storage
Cons
  • Not compatible with many third-party add-ons
  • Not as sturdy as some higher-end racks

Who It’s For

The SR-4000 Squat Rack from REP Fitness stands out as our top choice for those seeking a no-frills yet exceptionally stable squat rack. It’s a powerhouse designed for individuals looking to elevate their strength training without the unnecessary additions often associated with more extensive racks.

What Our Editors Say About It

In our hands-on experience, the SR-4000 Squat Rack has consistently demonstrated its exceptional stability, even under substantial weight loads.

Assembly is a breeze, even in tight spaces, making it an excellent fit for home gyms, garage setups, or small apartments.

Potential Drawbacks

While the SR-4000 Squat Rack excels in many aspects, its taller design may pose challenges for individuals with low ceilings in their home gym space. It’s essential to ensure your space can accommodate its vertical clearance comfortably.

Another consideration is the limited weight storage capacity of this rack. To address this, we recommend investing in a weight tree to keep your weights organized and easily accessible during your workouts.

Read more: Best Bumper Plates

Dimensions (D x W x H) 71.4″ x 52.4″ x 96″ or 103″
Maximum weight capacity 1,000 lb.
Weight 237 lb.
Weight storage Yes
Inside depth 71.4″

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How to Choose the Best Home Power Rack (for You)

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Power racks (a.k.a. “power cages”) are deceptively simple. Most models look like a durable, rugged steel cage that’s designed to serve as a base for your weighted workout equipment. Most also require adding optional add-ons if you want to use them for non-barbell exercises. There’s a lot to consider when shopping for the best home power rack for you:

Full vs. half rack: You’ll want to decide which one you need (and have space for). One is not better than the other—it’s mostly about the training experience you want.

In fact, half racks are actually found more often in commercial gyms than full racks. “The biggest difference is that you can’t train within a half rack. But for many people, training within the full rack can feel restrictive anyway,” explains Samuel.

Both are equally capable of ‘spotting’ you, as long as you pick up a half rack with spotter arms. The main difference in your home gym may come down to sturdiness. Half racks in commercial gyms and pro sports facilities are often anchored to weightlifting platforms, enhancing their solidity. If you can’t do that in your home gym and plan to squat or deadlift more than 400 pounds, err towards a full rack. Just know that it’ll have a massive footprint in your gym. If you’re training under 350 pounds, give serious thought to the half-rack: In most cases, it’ll save you precious home gym space.

Size: If you’re tight on space, you might opt for a foldable racks, because they’re great. From foot print size to height to additional accessory options, every cage will offers a slightly different level of customization. If you have larger home gym and are interesting in building things out, consider a power rack a strong starting point, and shop closely for the features that matter to you the most.

Make sure you have the floor space for a full rack, plus at least three feet on each side. If you use a bench in your training, you’ll also want at least 10 feet in front of the rack (to accommodate for the bench and have some room to spare.

Make sure you have at least one foot of clearance above you for the height of the rack, especially if you’re hoping to do pullups. If you don’t have that, the rack may still fit, but you won’t be able to do pullups.

Durability and weight capacity: The type of construction is heavily tied in with a rack’s total weight capacity. Almost every model on the market today is made of steel, alloy steel, or powder-coated steel. The true measure of strength is the gauge of steel used. The higher gauge, the stronger the cage. Beginners may not need to worry about this when starting out. But better-quality steel will always be safer, more durable, better equipped to handle heavy weights, and more long-lasting.

Every power rack has a corresponding weight limit with most models ranging between 300 and 1,500 pounds. Always aim for a rack that has at least a 500-pound weight capacity. No, you may never lift 500 pounds on any single movement, but you’ll thank yourself for having that margin for error if you ever miss on a squat and lose control of the bar.

Customizability: You’ll be tempted to turn your power rack into your entire home gym and pick up every accessory available, such as the cable attachment, the belt squat, etc. But a power rack is best as a power rack. So focus on that, instead of over-adding accessories. If you’re tight on space, sure, get the cable attachment, but know that, with rare exceptions, most rack cable attachments don’t come close to matching what you’ve come to experience at commercial gyms.

Attachments: Be careful not to waste money on added accessories and attachments. The only attachments you might want to take seriously for your power rack are a dip bar and jammer arms. Increasingly, today’s power racks offer extra accessories and attachments meant to make the power rack even more all-purpose, but in practice, these accessories are very rarely worth purchasing with your rack, according to Samuel. “The pulley system you add to your power rack simply won’t live up to the lat pulldown you might be imagining, so don’t overpay for added accessories just to say you have them,” he says.

The power rack is best used for its intended purpose: setting you up for heavy lifts like bench presses and squats, and offering a home for pullups. The other stuff just isn’t worth it.

    Power Rack vs. Half Rack: What’s the Difference?

    commerce breaker

    As you might’ve noticed, we’ve included a few half racks in the list above. There’s a distinct difference between power racks and half racks, but we’ve found that most people either don’t have the space for a full rack, or don’t really need more than a half rack at their fitness level. It’s up to you to decide which would better suit your needs.

    “A power rack is a 4-6 post rack you would do most of your lifts IN,” explains Otey. Think of a power rack as a cage-like structure. It also features at least two horizontal bars catches on each side, which are adjustable in height and function as mechanical spotters. Most power racks leave room to be outfitted with a variety of accessories like pulleys, a lat pull down bar, etc.

    A half rack, on the other hand, is a shallow 4 post where lifts are executed on the outside of the rack, Otey told Men’s Health. Half racks are comprised of 2 vertical posts and can also feature horizontal safety bars. That being said, the stability and maximum weight capacity associated with a half-rack is typically inferior compared to a power rack. If you are limited on space or are a beginner, a half-rack could be a solid choice for you. If you only have room for a half rack and are concerned about stability, look for one that gives the user an option to anchor or bolt the equipment to the ground.

    If you’re getting a half rack or squat rack, don’t even think about the accessories (i.e. belt squat, dip bar etc.). Squat racks generally lack the stability to support those accessories at a high level. Consider a squat rack as a way to do squats, pullups, and presses. If you want to lift super-heavy (think: rack pulls) opt for something else.

    Why Buy a Power Rack?

    commerce breaker

    It all comes down to one thing according to Otey: safety.

    Yeah, you can lift a barbell at home without a power rack, but when it comes to lifting safely without a human spotter, we highly recommend using it. “The key to working out at home is ensuring you are safe and there is no better way than having a power rack,” he says.

    It’s not a substitute for a human spot on your heaviest lifts (that’s how injuries happen!), but it does offer you security and assurance you might not have otherwise. The right power rack can also set you up to do pull-ups, hanging abs movements, and much more. Especially in this era, when racks are expandable and have added attachments that can push you farther.

    As our Fitness Director Ebenezer Samuel puts it, “This is the centerpiece of your home gym and it insures you’re pushing yourself with leg training.”

    With a home power rack, you can have access to more weight and versatility compared to dumbbells and other home-gym accessories combined, allowing you to progress your lifts without scrambling to find heavier dumbbells or compound movements.

    Many power racks offer a selection of accessories that allow you to perform additional strength training exercises straight from the rack. These add-ons will cost you in addition to the cage itself, but if you want to get the most out of your home gym investment, you’ll use a good power rack in a variety of ways.

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    How to Use a Power Rack

    commerce breaker

    A power rack can be used for virtually any barbell exercise you can think of. Think squatting, deadlift, bench pressing, all of the major lifts, says Otey. “A power rack can be a one-stop gym where everything can be accomplished.”

    It’s important to note that benches are often sold separately, and may not be included with a purchase of a cage. Depending on a rack’s specifications and add-ons, you may be able to use it to perform a variety of non-barbell strength exercises such as lat pull downs, pull ups, and pulley exercises. Although many of these accessories are compatible with various racks, it’s important to use them only with the equipment they were designed for.

    Additionally, be sure to only shop for a power rack that your space can accommodate. Power racks should only be utilized on an even, non-slip surface (check out these best home gym flooring options), away from stairs.

    Why You Can Trust Us

    commerce breaker

    At Men’s Health, we take great pride in providing our readers with reliable and trustworthy product recommendations. We believe that our readers deserve the best, which is why we always make sure to conduct thorough research and testing before making any recommendations. Our writers and editors thoughtfully select experts for collaboration on product recommendations, and are also experts in their own right, using their informed opinions to select products and ensuring that our content is of the highest quality.

    Our product recommendations are purely editorial, and while we may receive free products to test and review, we only recommend the products we are most impressed by. We never let retailers or public relations contacts dictate our content or product coverage. Which is why you can trust us to provide you with reliable and unbiased product recommendations.

    How We Selected

    commerce breaker

    Our in-house fitness experts and staff, including certified trainers Ebenezer Samuel, C.S.C.S., MH Fitness Director, and Senior Fitness Editor Brett Williams, NASM, have tested dozens of power racks throughout the years. Through our extensive testing process, we considered every essential feature from construction and durability to overall dimensions and weight capacity, plus any extra features, such as delivery, warranties, ease of assembly, and aesthetic.

    Each rack was put to the test with powerlifting and Olympic weightlifting exercises, with a minimum of 10 sets and 100 reps performed at both comfortable and near-max weights for each movement. Attachments including pull-up bars and spotter arms were utilized and considered in testing as well. We consulted with both our MH Advisory Board, and our Strength in Diversity trainers to poll them on their experiences with the top racks, too.

    Headshot of Ebenezer Samuel,  C.S.C.S.

    Ebenezer Samuel, C.S.C.S.

    Ebenezer Samuel, C.S.C.S., is the fitness director of Men’s Health and a certified trainer with more than 10 years of training experience. He’s logged training time with NFL athletes and track athletes and his current training regimen includes weight training, HIIT conditioning, and yoga. Before joining Men’s Health in 2017, he served as a sports columnist and tech columnist for the New York Daily News.  

    Headshot of Talene Appleton, NASM-CPT

    Fitness and Commerce Editor

    Talene Appleton is a fitness and food writer and editor, certified personal trainer (NASM-CPT), and former professional dancer based in New York City. Passionate about both exercise and cuisine, she merges her fitness, nutrition and culinary expertise with the goal of motivating others to embrace balanced healthy living. Her work has appeared in Men’s Health, General Surgery News, The Food Institute, The Nessie, and more.

    Headshot of David Otey, C.S.C.S.

    David Otey, CSCS is a fitness writer, NYC-based strength coach, and Men’s Health Advisory Board member who specializes in strength and hypertrophy protocols as well as athletic performance. For more on Otey check out www.oteyfitness.com.

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